Culture10 Local Ghanaian Foods You Need To Try

10 Local Ghanaian Foods You Need To Try

Local Ghanaian foods, just like that of other countries represent the way of life of Ghanaian folks. The local foods in Ghana represent Ghana culture. Culinary abilities in Ghanaian food preparation methods reflect various beliefs, customs, and habits, and the ingredients, cooking methods, and energy they put into feeding themselves go beyond nutrition.

Here are 10 of some Ghana foods you absolutely need to try.

10 Local Ghanaian Foods You Need To Try

Jollof Rice

Jollof Rice
Jollof Rice

Jollof Rice was originally a Senegalese pot dish. It is rice cooked with tomato sauce and served with meat or fish. The rice absorbs the juicy flavors and becomes orange when cooked, making it a national favorite that can be found in most restaurants or served cheaply by street sellers.

Jollof is the most popular dish in Ghana especially after social media trends comparing Jollof dishes of other countries to that of Ghana. You can follow this easy Guide to learn how to cook Jollof Rice.

Waakye

Waakye

Waakye is a Ghanaian breakfast or lunch meal consisting of purple boiled rice and beans. It is another coloured rice served in Ghana. The colour is naturally dyed as a result of sorghum leaves used in preparing this local Ghanaian dish.

Waakye has an exclusive taste when combined with Gari, “Wele” (coat) and Pear.

Banku and Tilapia

Banku and Tilapia
Banku and Tilapia

Banku is a slightly fermented corn-dough and cassava-dough combination fried into dumplings, very common in Ghana. ‘Banku and Tilapia’ is served with freshly ground pepper garnished with onions and other vegetables.

The Tilapia served with the Banku must be grilled to make up this local dish.

Red-Red

RedRed
Red Red

Red Red is a Ghanaian dish made of black-eyed peas and plantain, fried in palm oil/vegetable oil. The meal gets its name from the crimson tint that the red palm oil and fried plantain give it.

This Ghanaian food is consumed mostly at night, however is common to find people eating it during the day.

Kenkey and Fried fish

Kenkey and Fish
Kenkey and Fish

Kenkey, like banku, is a corn-based staple created by rolling fermented corn dough into balls and wrapping them with dried maize leaves, which are then cooked. The dish is a specialty of the Accra people and is eaten with spicy pepper sauce, fried crabs, octopus, or fish.

Omo Tuo

Omo Tuo
Omo Tuo

Omo tuo is a Ghanaian rice side dish with Hausa origins that is popular throughout the country.
Omo tuo, or “rice balls,” is a traditional Ghanaian rice dish. Broken rice or long grain rice that has been broken into smaller pieces is commonly utilized.

To make the rice softer, it is frequently cooked with extra water than usual. The dough is then beaten to make it smooth before being molded into large balls. It’s frequently eaten with a groundnut or palm nut soup in Ghana.

Fufu and Light soup

Fufu and Light Soup
Fufu and Light Soup

Fufu and light soup, the pride cuisine of the Akan: mostly in Ghana’s Eastern and Ashanti regions. Fufu is a staple food in West Africa, but it’s made in Ghana by pounding boiled cassava and plantains into a soft, sticky paste to serve with aromatic, spicy tomato soup. Any meat can be served along side the light but preferably Goat meat.

If you find your way in Ghana around Christmas time, look out for fufu. The dish is most enjoyed around that time.

Ampesi

Ampesi

Ampesi is boiled yam/plantain/cocoyam/cassava meal, or a combination of any two or all of them, eaten with Garden Egg Stew or Kontomire.

Its versatility is in the various servings and combinations. Yam with Garden Egg Stew, Yaw with Kontomire, Plantain with Garden Egg Stew, Plantain with Kontomire or even Yam and Plantain with Garden Egg Stew, Yam and Plantain with Kontomire.

Tuo Zaafi

Tuo Zaafi (Diehuo)
Tuo Zaafi (Diehuo)

Tuo Zaafi, also known as Diehuo, is a popular local Ghanaian dish commonly consumed in the Northern parts of Ghana. Reasons grains, herbs, and meat are the area’s principal food sources, northern Ghanaian cuisine is dominated by them.

Tuo Zaafi is produced by heating corn dough and adding a little cassava. Tuo Zaafi is similar to Banku, but it is softer and less sticky. The healthy and unusual herbs used in the accompanying soup, such as Dawa Dawa and Ayoyo leaves, differentiate Tuo Zaafi and make it a popular dinner nationwide.

Kelewele

Kelewele
Kelewele

Kelewele is a dish on its own depending on the food compliments. Recently, many people prefer it as a dessert.

You may be tempted to think Kelewele is the same as fried plantain but there’s a difference. Kelewele is over ripped plantain that has been soaked in a mixture of peppers, ginger, and garlic before being fried. The scent is fresh and powerful, with a lovely plantain flavor that balances off the sourness.

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